Thursday, September 16, 2021

A lot of promising intermittent fasting (IF) research has on overweight rats. Their blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels all improve when they lose weight… They are, however, rats. Almost all human studies have found that IF is safe and effective, but no more than any other diet. Furthermore, many people find fasting challenge.

However, a growing body of evidence reveals that the timing of the fast is crucial, making IF a more realistic, durable, and practical weight loss and diabetes prevention strategy.

What is the history of intermittent fasting?

It has been around in various forms for a long time. Still, it was popularised in 2012 by BBC broadcast journalist Dr. Michael Mosley’s TV documentary Eat Fast, Live Longer and book The Fast Diet, which by journalist Kate Harrison’s book The 5:2 Diet, which on her own experience, and then by Dr. Jason Fung’s 2016 best-selling The Obesity Code as anecdotes of its success grew IF built a consistently favorable buzz.

I needed to grasp the science as a lifestyle-oriented research doctor. I liked The Obesity Code since it looked to be the best evidence-based overview resource. Fung expertly mixes a wealth of research, his clinical knowledge, and sound nutrition advice, as well as addressing the socioeconomic issues at work in our obesity epidemic. He is adamant that we should consume more fruits and vegetables, fiber, good protein, and fats while avoiding sugar, refined grains, processed meats, and snacking, for God’s sake. Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes The one part of the plan that I was still unsure about was the intermittent fasting portion.

Weight loss can occur by intermittent fasting.

If you think about it, it makes a lot of logic. Enzymes in our gut break down the food we ingest, which then becomes molecules in our circulation. Suppose our cells don’t use it all as fat in our fat cells. On the other hand, sugar can only enter our cells through insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that transports sugar into fat cells and keeps it there.

Our insulin levels will drop between meals if we don’t snack, and our fat cells will release their stored sugar as energy. If we allow our insulin levels to drop, we lose weight. The whole point of IF is to allow insulin levels to drop low enough and long enough that fat.

Fasting regularly can be challenging, But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Human studies comparing fasting every other day versus eating less every day found that both methods worked roughly equally well for weight loss, albeit fasting days were more difficult for people. So I dismissed IF as no better or worse than eating less but much more inconvenient. My recommendation was to stick to a Mediterranean-style diet that was prudent and plant-based.

According to a new study, not all IF diets are created equal, and some are pretty realistic, effective, and long-term, especially when accompanied by a nutritious plant-based diet. As a result, I’m ready to take my lumps on this one (and even revise my prior post).

We’ve evolved to follow the day/night cycle, often known as a circadian rhythm. Our metabolism has adapted to eating during the day and sleeping at night. A lot of promising intermittent fasting (IF) research has on overweight rats. Their blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels all improve when they lose weight… They are, however, rats. Almost all human studies have found that IF is safe and effective, but no more than any other diet. Furthermore, many people find fasting challenge.

However, a growing body of evidence reveals that the timing of the fast is crucial, making IF a more realistic, durable, and practical weight loss and diabetes prevention strategy.

What is the history of intermittent fasting?

It has been around in various forms for a long time. Still, it was popularised in 2012 by BBC broadcast journalist Dr. Michael Mosley’s TV documentary Eat Fast, Live Longer and book The Fast Diet, which by journalist Kate Harrison’s book The 5:2 Diet, which on her own experience, and then by Dr. Jason Fung’s 2016 best-selling The Obesity Code as anecdotes of its success grew IF built a consistently favorable buzz.

I needed to grasp the science as a lifestyle-oriented research doctor. I liked The Obesity Code since it looked to be the best evidence-based overview resource. Fung expertly mixes a wealth of research, his clinical knowledge, and sound nutrition advice, as well as addressing the socioeconomic issues at work in our obesity epidemic. He is adamant that we should consume more fruits and vegetables, fiber, good protein, and fats while avoiding sugar, refined grains, processed meats, and snacking, for God’s sake. Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes The one part of the plan that I was still unsure about was the intermittent fasting portion.

Weight loss can occur by intermittent fasting.

If you think about it, it makes a lot of logic. Enzymes in our gut break down the food we ingest, which then becomes molecules in our circulation. Suppose our cells don’t use it all, as fat in our fat cells. On the other hand, sugar can only enter our cells through insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that transports sugar into fat cells and keeps it there.

Our insulin levels will drop between meals if we don’t snack, and our fat cells will release their stored sugar as energy. If we allow our insulin levels to drop, we lose weight. The whole point of IF is to allow insulin levels to drop low enough and long enough that fat.

Fasting regularly can be challenging, But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Human studies comparing fasting every other day versus eating less every day found that both methods worked roughly equally well for weight loss, albeit fasting days were more difficult for people. So I dismissed IF as no better or worse than eating less but much more inconvenient. My recommendation was to stick to a Mediterranean-style diet that was prudent and plant-based.

According to a new study, not all IF diets are created equal, and some are pretty realistic, effective, and long-term, especially when accompanied by a nutritious plant-based diet. As a result, I’m ready to take my lumps on this one (and even revise my prior post).

Researchers from the University of Alabama used this information to study a small group of obese males with prediabetes. They contrasted “early time-restricted feeding,” a type of intermittent fasting in which all meals were squeezed into an early eight-hour period of the day (7 a.m. to 3 p.m.) or spread out over 12 hours (between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.). Both groups did not gain or lose weight, but the eight-hour group had much lower insulin levels and significantly increased insulin sensitivity, as well as substantially lower blood pressure after five weeks. What’s the best part? The appetite of the eight-hour group was likewise dramatically reduced. They weren’t hungry.

Even persons who didn’t lose a pound saw a considerable improvement in their metabolism simply by eating earlier in the day and extending the nighttime fast.

What are the benefits of adjusting the timing?

But why can simply altering our meal schedule to allow for fasting make a difference in our bodies? A recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine throws some insight into the science of IF. Fasting has been ingrained in our physiology for millennia, stimulating several vital biological functions. We are switching from a fed to a fasted state that does more than just calorie burning and weight loss. The researchers looked at dozens of animal and human studies to figure out how fasting improves metabolism, lowers blood sugar, reduces inflammation, helps with everything from arthritic pain to asthma, and even helps clear out toxins and damaged cells, which lowers cancer risk and improves brain function. The post is lengthy, but it is well worth reading!

Is intermittent fasting as beneficial as it appears?

I was intrigued, so I sought the advice of Dr. Deborah Wexler, Director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Diabetes Center and associate professor at Harvard Medical School, what she said to me. “There is data to show that the circadian rhythm fasting strategy, in which meals are limited to an eight to ten-hour period during the daytime, is successful,” she acknowledged, but she generally advises patients to “choose an eating plan that works for them and is sustainable.”

So, here’s the situation. There is some excellent scientific evidence that suggests that when combined with a healthy diet and lifestyle, circadian rhythm fasting can be a particularly successful method for weight loss, especially for persons at risk of diabetes. (However, people with advanced diabetes or who are using diabetes drugs, those with a history of eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia, and pregnant or breastfeeding women should not try intermittent fasting unless a physician well monitors them.)

Fruits, vegetables, beans, lentils, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats should be consumed instead (a sensible, plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet).

Allow your body to burn fat in the intervals between meals. Don’t eat anything. Maintain a high level of activity throughout the day—tone up your muscles.

Consider a straightforward example of intermittent fasting. Limit your eating hours during the day, and eat earlier for the best results (between 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., or even 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., but not in the evening before bed).

Always avoid snacking or eating late at night. At night has been linked to an increased risk of obesity and diabetes.

Researchers from the University of Alabama used this information to study a small group of obese males with prediabetes. They contrasted “early time-restricted feeding,” a type of intermittent fasting in which all meals were squeezed into an early eight-hour period of the day (7 a.m. to 3 p.m.) or spread out over 12 hours (between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.). Both groups did not gain or lose weight, but the eight-hour group had much lower insulin levels and significantly increased insulin sensitivity, as well as substantially lower blood pressure after five weeks. What’s the best part? The appetite of the eight-hour group was likewise dramatically reduced. They weren’t hungry.

Even persons who didn’t lose a pound saw a considerable improvement in their metabolism simply by eating earlier in the day and extending the nighttime fast.

What are the benefits of adjusting the timing?

But why can simply altering our meal schedule to allow for fasting make a difference in our bodies? A recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine throws some insight into the science of IF. Fasting has been ingrained in our physiology for millennia, stimulating several vital biological functions. We are switching from a fed to a fasted state that does more than just calorie burning and weight loss. The researchers looked at dozens of animal and human studies to figure out how fasting improves metabolism, lowers blood sugar, reduces inflammation, helps with everything from arthritic pain to asthma, and even helps clear out toxins and damaged cells, which lowers cancer risk and improves brain function. The post is lengthy, but it is well worth reading!

Is intermittent fasting as beneficial as it appears?

I was intrigued, so I sought the advice of Dr. Deborah Wexler, Director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Diabetes Center and associate professor at Harvard Medical School, what she said to me. “There is data to show that the circadian rhythm fasting strategy, in which meals are limited to an eight to ten-hour period during the daytime, is successful,” she acknowledged, but she generally advises patients to “choose an eating plan that works for them and is sustainable.”

So, here’s the situation. There is some excellent scientific evidence that suggests that when combined with a healthy diet and lifestyle, circadian rhythm fasting can be a particularly successful method for weight loss, especially for persons at risk of diabetes. (However, people with advanced diabetes or who are using diabetes drugs, those with a history of eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia, and pregnant or breastfeeding women should not try intermittent fasting unless a physician well monitors them.)

Fruits, vegetables, beans, lentils, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats should be consumed instead (a sensible, plant-based, Mediterranean-style diet).

Allow your body to burn fat in the intervals between meals. Don’t eat anything. Maintain a high level of activity throughout the day—tone up your muscles.

Consider a straightforward example of intermittent fasting. Limit your eating hours during the day, and eat earlier for the best results (between 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., or even 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., but not in the evening before bed).

Always avoid snacking or eating late at night.

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